Training up your child the way Jonathan Edwards was Trained

From vacation reading: A Short Life of Jonathan Edwards by George M. Marsden (kindle edition)

This is what it was like to grow up in the 1700’s in homes that really loved the Lord Jesus and took his Word seriously.

So pious New Englanders like the Edwardses, despite  their emphasis on grace, insisted on good works as much as anyone.  They lived under strict discipline of law and practices of piety. Every child knew the Ten Commandments and was taught to observe them to the letter, as much as was humanly possible. Every day and every meal began and ended with family or personal prayers and devotions (Loc 220-22, kindle edition).

The praying before and after eating is delightfully different. That too can get in the meaningless repetition of the routine but it doesn’t have to be so. For someone like me who was raised praying before a meal, it would certainly be a fresh addition to my personal practice. My wife sometimes suggests we pray after just to break the assumption that we always need to pray before the meal. I can agree with her motivation. No one can say they pray too much and if adding a meaningful and direct moment to address the living God is too much for some than I must exclude myself from that group. God is good and it ought to be a joy for me and my family to talk to him. Now if I can just remember to do that tomorrow when we eat then we can let the practice begin!

My kids don’t know the 10 commandments yet. They will. As they learn this catechism, questions 48-89 will cover them thoroughly. It is a good thing to learn and apply to the kids to push them to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

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About pjtibayan

I love Jesus Christ and live to share life and share Jesus together with First Southern Baptist Church of Bellflower primarily to Southeast Los Angeles County.
This entry was posted in Books read, books recommended, Jonathan Edwards, Parenting. Bookmark the permalink.

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